At the start of GamerGate in September 2014, a chap called Max Read who was an editor at Gawker wrote an editorial piece declaring war on gamers. He hoped to make the term a dirty word. When Intel pulled their ads as a result of his editorial insanity he called them a few names;

“… So let’s say it now: Intel is run by craven idiots. It employs pusillanimous morons. It lacks integrity. It folded to misogynists and bigots who objected to a woman who had done nothing more than write a piece claiming a place in the world of video games. And even when confronted with its own thoughtlessness and irresponsibility, it could not properly right its wrongs …”

Oh dear.

It’s taken a while for his hubris to catch up with him, but dear Max has been fired, sorry! sorry!, I mean ‘resigned.’ And the more mainstream sites are starting to catch on that maybe, just maybe, these GamerGate people might be on to something:

“… When a friend, Beth Haper, first alerted me to the cultural significance of #GamerGate, I was skeptical. Really? A bunch of gamers were going to expose the bias and corruption of the media? This seemed improbable, but the fact that #GamerGate was arrayed against feminists drew my interest because, of course, I was working on a book (Sex Trouble, $11.69 in paperback, $1.99 on Kindle) about radical feminism’s War on Human Nature. Let us stipulate that #GamerGate is not “political” in the usual Left/Right Democrat/Republican way that Americans typically think about politics. Nevertheless, as fate would have it, the exposure of the Zoe Quinn/Nathan Grayson connection made gamers aware how unscrupulous women could exploit feminist politics and how unprincipled journalists were willing to assist this tawdry little racket. (See “The #GamerGate vs. Gawker War.”)…”

That quote is from a piece over at the other mccain, and a damn fine piece it is too. Have a read of it and rejoice that things are slowly turning around. Although if you’re not rejoicing, then I suppose you need to start being a little worried. Or afraid.

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